A plethora of rams

 

 

 

It’s almost time to put the rams in with the ewes. I’ve been looking at my sheep list to match up ewes and rams. It makes the most sense for me to use only 2 or 3 rams. Keep the biggest group in the pasture and smaller groups where they will need to be fed hay. But I have an exciting stable of new rams to try. So I think that I’ll have more groups than is really smart.Faulkner is going to be used on some older ewes . This is an experiment to see how crossbred lambs will do for the meat market. My guess is that they will be ready for market sooner and at a higher weight. There may be some interesting pelts as well. Faulkner is a character. Dan says that he reminds him of the Grateful Dead. “truckin’, just keep truckin’ on”.”Hey, man, good grass.”

Mud Ranch’s Hudson is a lilac ram with spectacular horns. He will be bred to all my lilac ewes or those with lilac parents. It’s been several years since I’ve had lilac lambs and Hudson will give me plenty. (Most Jacobs are black and white. Lilac refers to a color other than black–usually a brownish-gray.)

This is the yearling,ย Sweetgrass Clint, ready for some ewes. He came from Michigan last year.

Clint’s son, Clapton, out of Meridian Jazz. He will be 6 months old the first week of October. I hope he’ll be ready to work soon. His horns and fleece look great. I would have shown him at State Fair but somehow he knocked out 3 teeth just prior to the show. You can’t take a sheep with a bloody mouth to the fair. Clapton is an “E” generation lamb and I’d like to breed my unrelated E ewes to him.

Here is one of the new ram lambs, #337 is from Ingrid Painter’s Puddleduck flock in Oregon. He needs a name.

 

Ruby Peak Linden is also from Oregon. These two rams lambs will be 6 months old in mid-October. I’m going to give them both some ewes and see what happens.

If I haven’t forgotten anyone that is already 6 rams, which is more than enough. So these ram lambs may have to wait until next year unless someone buys them this season. This is Meridian Siskiyou, sired by one of my favorite rams, Tioga.

 

This two horn ram has a great horn spread and I’ll probably keep him around to see how he turns out.

I like the horn spread on this ram also. I like his color, also, even though he is on the dark side and should not be used with ewes who are also very dark. His wool looks quilted in this photo but is is not when you see him in real life.

 

 

 

 

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10 thoughts on “A plethora of rams

  1. I am also up to six rams, Robin. Linda cracked me up last week when she mentioned that she almost feels like she’d like her ewes to be monogomous!!!! (Joking of course and it tickled my funny bone to no end.) In my case, I have a sheep addiction and somehow I am able to convince myself that getting another RAM doesn’t really count! I have to say, it is a lot of fun having so many options.

  2. I’m so glad to hear that “Another ram doesn’t really count” because I will be using 5 this year as soon as my new ones get here. My husband says I’m nuts but I knew that already.

    Robin, I’m still kicking myself and my husband for not picking up that ewe lamb from you at the A.G.M. she has the most beautiful fleece on her. If she ever becomes available next year please let me know.

  3. Just keep telling yourself ‘it will all be fine’ ๐Ÿ™‚ I will have used 7 different rams this year! It helps that you have mostly ram lambs because they can usually share a fenceline. Falkner is such a handsome guy! I think I need a few BFL wethers…just because ๐Ÿ˜‰

  4. Gosh that’s an awesome photo of Hudson, Robin! He almost took my breath away, and I’m not just being bias either. ๐Ÿ˜‰ Nice line-up of rams. I’m using four rams this year and that almost seems overwhelming (mainly because of lack of pasture, not necessarily space.) I just ordered my markers, hoping they’ll be here before this next weekend… Nothing like procrastination!

    • Sometimes I look out in that field and see Hudson flat on his side and I think that he is dead. We’ve decided that it must be the weight of his horns and it’s more comfortable if he doesn’t have to hold his head up. Robin

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